Sunday, July 31, 2011

Weekly Smorgasbord

Links for this week:



Posted: 30 Jul 2011 10:37 AM PDT
This is such a hard, hard issue. I've used the "lifestyle" AND "hate the sin" phrases and I stand by that, but at the same time MY heart breaks for the writer and those like her. I can't imagine the pain of knowing you would never be able to be with someone you loved. I also know there is a school of thought about being homosexuals being able to undergo "reparative therapy" and be changed. I DO believe God can change people, but I've also heard horror stories about that kind of thing. Complicated. [Edited to add: I'm not sure I was clear enough on my position.  I assumed my second sentence provided enough clarity on where I stand personally on this issue, but I'm not sure it did.  So, from my comments, in response to some thought provoking dialogue:  I certainly don't think we should condone this behavior at all, just as we shouldn't condone any sin. As I said in the original post, I've used the "love the sinner, hate the sin" phrase many a time and I stand by that. I don't think hate is too strong a word and I do hate the sin that she is engaging in and won't apologize for it. I guess my point in linking to it was to say that while I don't agree with her choices and am not afraid to call it what is, I do feel a certain sadness for her and can't imagine her pain, just as I couldn't imagine the pain of someone who truly desired a husband or a child and yet never saw those dreams fulfilled. Obviously, in the end it is necessary to trust Christ for healing, whatever the circumstances.]

Teacher versus former student on Facebook. If you're a s... on Twitpic
Posted: 29 Jul 2011 01:14 PM PDT
Okay, STRONG LANGUAGE WARNING, but this was hilarious, in my opinion.


Science & Sensibility » NPR’s Beginnings Series Warns of the Risks of Elective Induction
Posted: 28 Jul 2011 08:12 PM PDT
I know some people don't want this to turn into "Natural Childbirth Blog", but I thought this was interesting. Also, I think the whole "Beginings" series sounds fascinating. And for the record, I like the author cannot speak from a "lofty pedestal", as I had an elective induction round one.
Posted: 28 Jul 2011 07:57 PM PDT
I think having a sample is helpful and this one (I think) pretty much covers most everything. Also? MAN, I wish I could have worn my own clothes.
Posted: 27 Jul 2011 11:16 PM PDT
What a terrible practice. It makes me so sad that these kinds of things happen in the world.
Posted: 27 Jul 2011 09:32 AM PDT
This is one of my favorite movie and P Dubbs does a fantastic job of articulating why.
Anything else good, send it this way!

7 comments:

Ashley said...

I know I will catch heat for this comment (not from you), but I don't believe the homosexuality issue is as complicated as it seems. There's a lot I could say on the subject, but God is not a cruel God; He doesn't create people that directly go against what He says in His word. Won't go into the ins and outs of the article, but I think it's important to just go back to what God says in His Word regarding this behavior. I personally feel like it's really clear.

Sarah Denley said...

Ash, I agree that God's word is clear about that "lifestyle" to use the phrase the author hated. I think it's clear in the same way it's clear about any sort of sexual sin. At the same time, I can't really reconcile that those FEELINGS are a choice, although obviously living that lifestyle is. THAT is what is complicated to me.

Ashley said...

I know you are opposed to the lifestyle; I didn't word that right! We'll talk sometime in person and dissect things like we usually do ;) Love you.

Kristal said...

I read that rage against the minivan article article last week and wondered if you would link it. :)

I'm with Ashley wholeheartedly on this. And I also hate how invthe comments, there are a lot of references about 'my truth' and 'your truth'. There is no subjective truth, there is only THE truth, and that is God's word, which is very clear on this issue.

I agree that it's heartbreaking for this girl (and many like her). But I also want to point out that while the feelings may be hard to deal with, I don't see much of a difference between hers and the feelings associated wih any other sexual sin. Porn, premarital sex, etc...all come with feelings and strong desires. And this sounds incredibly harsh, but I'll put it out there anyway - I don't think her cross to bear is any worse than a man dealing with a porn addiction or a teenager fighting hormones.

Sarah Denley said...

Kristal, TOTALLY agree with you about the comments. I call BS on anybody talking about "my own personal truth". Hate that.

I kind of disagree to an extent on the porn/hormones comparison. Or at least I'm not sure I can agree with it. The thing is I struggled a lot with the hormones as a teenager. Peyton and I dated for four years and those were a HARD for years. But I knew there was a light at the end of the tunnel. I knew that we'd be able to be together one day as husband and wife. We also allowed ourselves to enjoy a lot of emotional intimacy apart from a physical relationship that I don't think would be appropriate between two people of the same sex.

My best friend (a guy) really struggled with porn and I think that analogy falls apart of some levels, too. He also was able to see that the Lord had something better for him in the form of a real woman.

I know that James Dobson and lots of other Christians think that homosexuals can be changed and have loving relationships with the opposite sex and even get married. In fact, Ellis (my above friend) actually went to one of his "Love Won Out" conferences because he had several gay friends interested in trying it and he wanted to support them. I don't dispute that it's possible or even relatively easy for an all powerful God to work in such an extreme way. But...

I guess to me a more comparable example would be a missionary or someone else that is called to a life of celibacy and singleness(I'm not going to use nuns or the preisthood because I kind of think those are human imposed restrictions). Because even if it is possible to be changed, not everyone is and for some this would basically mean a LIFE of celibacy. That's were it's different from porn/hormones. Knowing (or thinking) that you were going to be living the rest of your life without the potential of finding a partner, sexual or otherwise, would be a hard cross to bear. Certainly a worthy one, and in my opinion, a required one, but a very hard one nonetheless. I honestly probably should have made this into a whole post and I may end up doing so. Thanks for helping me work through my thoughts on this, girls!

Ashley said...

Just a thought: when you're single and struggling with porn or hormones, etc., you're NOT guaranteed a spouse or a "reprieve" from your struggle. You aren't promised a mate with which those longings can be fulfilled. God may choose not to bring that person into your life. So in my opinion, it is necessary for everyone, regardless of their temptation or the level of it, to give it to Christ and trust Him to deal with those issues.

I don't agree with some methods of trying to "heal" homosexuality or going to a conference and be guaranteed to walk out changed. It boils down to people - of whatever orientation - giving their struggles to God and letting Him transform them.

The author of the article was justifying her sin and saying "I blatantly choose to live a life that goes against God's Word because I am wired this way." Thats a very dangerous thing to say about anything, not just homosexuality. We're all wired to sin, but why are we as Christians supposed to condone this and make exceptions in our convictions just for this particular issue? I'm not saying you feel that way; just wanted to articulate better what I was trying to say.

Sarah Denley said...

Ashley- agreed, no one is promised anything in regards to this. Which is one reason I pray for our children's spouses "if they are so blessed". It's strange to me the number of Christian parents operating under the assumption that their children will get married one day. At the same time, I do feel like as a typical, straight teenager I felt more potential for that relationship than I would suspect a gay teenager would feel.

I certainly don't think we should condone this behavior at all, just as we shouldn't condone any sin. As I said in the original post, I've used the "love the sinner, hate the sin" phrase many a time and I stand by that. I don't think hate is too strong a word and I do hate the sin that she is engaging in and won't apologize for it. I guess my point in linking to it was to say that while I don't agree with her choices and am not afraid to call it what is, I do feel a certain sadness for her and can't imagine her pain, just as I couldn't imagine the pain of someone who truly desired a husband or a child and yet never saw those dreams fulfilled. Obviously, in the end it is necessary to trust Christ for healing.